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My friend Meredith Dancause was recently asked the following question:

Why don’t young leaders want to work for megachurches anymore?

Here was her answer:

In the era of “Too Big to Fail,” it should be no surprise that young leaders are steering away from megachurches for their place of employment. While megachurches may not be too big to fail, they are now often seen as “Too Big to Change” - and change is exactly what is needed in this day and age. Young leaders want to make a dramatic impact wherever they choose to work. They want to be part of a visioning process that brings about new life and new energy to the church. While megachurches may have the resources to employ young leaders, unless they can offer them a serious sphere of influence that has the potential to change the course of the church, most young leaders will offer their time, talent and energy to a church where they can see their own impact. It’s not that all megachurches necessarily need to change - many have thriving ministries and excellent leadership - but the fact remains, many up-and-coming leaders feel their contribution will be only a small drop in a very large bucket. So if given a choice, many of them will steer toward a more flexible church environment where they can maximize their leadership impact.

As a young leader who happens to work in a megachurch, I wrestle with this question nearly everyday. If I’m completely honest, sometimes I find that the structure of the building and the systems that govern it feel antithetical to the kind of community I long to create. And yet, nearly everyday I hear beautiful stories of redemption and restoration. Also, I can’t help but to feel called to be a part of moving and changing it for the future. So in my case, the tension is good.

However, I’m much more curious to hear your thoughts.

Why do you think young leaders don’t want to work for megachurches? Or, why do you think that they do?

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